Good therapist for depression

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Good therapist for depression

Good therapist for depression

Finding a good therapist for depression is very important. There are many reasons why depression develops. There are also various reasons why people with depression seek therapy. Not every therapist is for everyone though. It is very important that you find a therapist you are comfortable with. You deserve to find a therapist who fits best for you. Unless you know what you’re looking for, it may not always be obvious what to ask. You do have rights to ask questions. Here are five important questions which may help you discover a good therapist for depression; the right one for you:

1. What is his/her general approach to clients?
Every therapist has his/her own defined ways or approaches. Therapeutic relationships vary. Some therapists are very active in session, while others take a more non-directive role. Which style might be better for you? It is important to ask yourself whether the therapist’s approach fits you and your needs. For example, a person-centred therapist (one who practices this specific approach alone) will not give you homework, or teach exercises and techniques for treatment. Instead, s/he will employ an approach to help you find solutions to your problems from within. Whereas therapists who draw primarily from the Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (CBT) approach will be more goal-oriented and active. They will work with you to identify a set of goals to achieve which would be worked upon in collaboration with the therapist. It is more action orientated.

Good therapist for depression

 

Remember, no technique is necessarily right or wrong. The important aspect for finding a good therapist for depression, is that it is compatible with what you are seeking.

2. Is s/he trustworthy?
Therapy is a therapeutic and professional relationship. Therefore, it becomes utmost important that your therapist is someone whom you can trust. By necessity, therapy is usually not easy or enjoyable. It often requires facing up to painful difficulties and life patterns. If there is no trust or respect, it can be difficult sticking to his or her approach and therapy.
Having said that, it is also important to know where to draw the line. Therapy is not the same as friendship, and it certainly should never feel like a romantic relationship. It is a professional alliance with a goal of helping you change your life for the better. Ask yourself whether you feel that he or she is a good “fit” for you and your challenges you may be facing with depression. Not all human beings fit well together, and that’s okay. The important thing is for you to find a therapist who fits your needs and preferences at this point in your life.

3. Does s/he have the right expertise to actually be a good therapist for depression?
Just as doctors have a specialization, in a similar way, therapists have areas of expertise. If a therapist works in multiple domains such as relationships, mental health and drugs and alcohol, financial counselling, youth, budgeting or whatever else, it doesn’t at all mean that s/he has a good command over all those areas. Not surprisingly though, a lot of therapists have strong skills in working with issues that are experienced by a large number of people, such as depression, anxiety, and stress. However, many problems, including trauma, grief, marital conflict, and work-related issues, don’t necessarily fall neatly into any of these categories. If in doubt, it’s always a good idea to ask potential therapists whether they have
training and experience in working with clients who have challenges similar to your own. Therapists trained in CBT to work with people who experience depression may be a good fit for you. As mentioned however, you need to feel comfortable regardless of his or her approach. This is not to say that feeling comfortable necessarily means staying in your comfort zone. We often need to step outside our comfort zone to progress. Being comfortable in a therapeutic relationship involves aspects such as whether you feel the therapist can convey empathy, and someone who you feel is non-judgmental, or perhaps it might just simply be something inside you that says “this is the type of person I think I can communicate with”.

Good therapist for depression

4. How often may you want therapy?
There are certain problems or challenges which require more frequent sessions and meetings than the normal scheduled ones. However, people often do not consider this factor when choosing their therapist. If you think you need extra meetings due to your challenges with depression, or that you will need more intensive therapy than a once-a-week, talk to your therapist before initiating your treatment with him or her. Get this clear.

5. Do you see that the therapist has potential to help you with depression?
Depression has no “quick-fix” for resolution. People often only start getting relief at least a couple of months after beginning therapy. It is certainly a possibility to get some relief after only a single session of therapy, but this is usually not the case.

Nonetheless, during the first few sessions, it is important to ask yourself whether you believe that there is at least a potential that this therapist will be helpful to you. Even if your therapist does not actively ask for feedback after first few sessions of your therapy, it is nothing wrong to express your honest opinion about what you feel is working and what isn’t. It is ultimately your needs that are of importance here, not the therapist. There is help for depression. Don’t face this alone.

Good therapist for depression

Best regards. You are not a label!

Paul Inglis.

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Good therapist for depression

 

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