Building Courage 

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Building Courage 

Building Courage 

Firstly, what is courage? Courage is strength in times of pain or grief. Building courage is the process of coming to the realisation or admitting that you have fears, yet being willing to find a way to overcome those fears and not allow these fears to get the better of you. We all face adversities in life, and facing up to a mental health challenge (or disorder) is certainly something that requires courage (among several other elements) to get life back on track.

Certainly, when dealing with mental health problems, we often need the help of professional people such as psychologists. They have a valuable role and I have no idea what I would be doing today myself with the help and commitment from my psychologist over four years. However, we do have our own responsibilities with particular elements of recovery that we must muster up ourselves. Courage is a quality from within a person. We may be inspired by others and feel motivated by courageous actions of others, but to maintain our own courageous attitude in the long journey of managing mental health problems or challenges, we need to keep that fire alive ourselves and help ourselves the best we can, and a significant part of this is by utilizing out courageous qualities within.

Building Courage 

While building courage, you start to improve your personal life, and in turn this can really help a lot in living a much better life as far as recovery of mental health problems. Building courage will help you take risks to a brighter future that you ordinarily would not take. When you build courage, you put fear behind you, and perhaps a part of getting stuck in a rut is the fear of facing unknown outcomes, or the pain that it might take in facing mental health problems head on. You don’t have a fear of failure. An example of what is meant here, is that a person who has problems with alcohol, may need to firstly face up to the problem, and work through some painful issues before being able to successfully say no to alcohol.

So, once you start building courage, you will start to self-direct your journey of recovery. You will learn to accept consequences and rewards gracefully. A person with courage will often feel motivated to accept responsibility while reviewing their actions and using what they learn to progress towards recovery/ living an improved life. Courageous people will step to the front, rather than stepping back when opportunities come their way. On the other hand, a courageous person will step back and take a view at his or her mistakes gracefully.

Building courage

Your journey of recovery is self-directed.

 

Sometimes the courageous person is spontaneous. It is arguably better not to plan each day in detail, because no one knows what the next day will bring. How many times have you planned something all to see it go pear-shaped the next day?   Planning is not necessarily always in your favour. People with courage are sometimes spontaneous.

In getting on top of mental health issues you need to trust yourself, and when you do this, it is easier to trust others too. Unfortunately, we live in a world where trust is hard to find, yet when you trust yourself, you can’t blame others when things go wrong. Quite often in life, we feel uncomfortable. Are you willing to accept your discomforts? Do you accept the things you cannot change? Do you accept the things you have control over? Do you accept yourself for who you are? Do you accept the changes that life brings your way?

Mental health issues, even though they may seem insurmountable, can actually give us an opportunity to become better equipped to handle other problems that crop up in life. Medications have their place, along with counsellors, psychologists and so-forth, but is there really any substitute for courage? Courage alone may be nowhere near enough as to what is needed to recover from issues such as Anorexia, but it can be a real ally.

Best regards from Paul at Beyond My Label.

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Building courage


 

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